Archive for the ‘Steenbergs’ Category

Niki’s Pumpkin and Dark Chocolate Loaf

Friday, October 13th, 2017

Recipe from lovely Niki Bakes in a autumnal homage to Steenbergs Organic Pumpkin Pie Spice Mix

Ombre golden-copper leaves, glossy plum chestnuts and cooler nights…it can only mean autumn! But where would we be without our beloved squashes I hear you say? Yes, you can make soup, yes, you can roast them and yes, you can make pumpkin pie but how about a pumpkin loaf slathered in dark chocolate?! You’ll love how easy and quick it is guys and what’s more, its gluten free and dairy free, happy days!

Recipe for Niki's Dark Chocolate and Pumpkin Pie spice loaf

Recipe for Niki’s Dark Chocolate and Pumpkin Pie spice loaf

All you need is:
Use organic/natural real food ingredients where possible)
Ingredients:
Serves 4-6
For the Pumpkin Loaf:
120g of almond flour
50g of coconut flour
¼ teaspoon of sea salt
1 teaspoon of  organic pumpkin pie spice
100ml of coconut oil, melted
4 eggs, beaten lightly
1 teaspoon of baking powder
1 teaspoon of ground of cinnamon

For the Dark Chocolate Glaze:
100g of dark chocolate, melted
1 tablespoon of pumpkin seeds

Method:
Step 1:
Preheat your oven to gas mark 4/180 degrees and line your loaf tin with greaseproof paper, set aside.
Step 2:
Whisk all your wet ingredients in a bowl.
Step 3:
Slowly sift your almond flour, coconut flour, spices and baking powder and add your wet ingredients.
Step 4:
Mix well and pour into your loaf pan, bake for about 45 -55 minutes.
Step 5:
Allow to cool completely before frosting your loaf tin with your dark chocolate and scattering over your pumpkin seeds. Allow to cool before slicing your loaf and enjoy with a cup of strong earl grey tea…absolutely heavenly!

Happy Baking!

Copywrite – Niki Beh
Recipe Creator and founder of nikibakes

Rice and Spice by Anna Kochan

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

Every now and again you meet someone who inspires you. Anna Kochan is one of those people. I met her at Food Festival in Leeds and was asking about her story and why she had written and published – Rice and Spice by Anna Kochan, a Bengali Food Adventure.

It turns out that Anna was listening to the Radio one morning where they were talking about a charity in Kolkata, India which supports the street children, called Future Hope Charity. (This was before the plight was highlighted even further by the amazing book and film – Lion by Saroo Brierley , and he was one of the lucky ones).

Everyday Indian recipes captured by Anna Kochan into this delightful recipe book and sold in aid of Future Hope Charity

  Everyday Indian recipes captured by Anna Kochan into this delightful recipe book and sold in aid of Future Hope Charity

Inspired by the report she contacted the charity and volunteered in Kolkata for 6 months. Whilst she was there she collected “everyday” traditional Begali recipes, including breads, dals, curries and vegetable dishes. The majority of the recipes are vegetarian, but there are a few classic chicken and fish recipes. I can vouch for their tastiness as I was being allowed to taste gorgeous aubergine pakoras and chick pea dal.

These are Anna's cookery teachers where she learnt how to create traditional everyday Bengali food to feed the children

These are Anna’s cookery teachers where she learnt how to create traditional everyday Bengali food to feed the children

A classic Thali that Anna has recreated in her recipe book.

A classic Thali that Anna has recreated in her recipe book.

All the money raised from the sale of the books (I do mean ALL as all the costs have been taken care of ) are going to this amazing charity – Future Hope.

Some of the children being helped by the Future Hope Charity in Kolkata, India.

Some of the children being helped by the Future Hope Charity in Kolkata, India.

Now celebrating its 30th anniversary, Future Hope gives the most needy children in Kolkata a secure stable home and a great education. Every day, more than 250 boys and girls attend Future Hope’s school and enjoy a nutritious Bengali home-cooked lunch. bout half of the live in one of Future Hope’s seven homes.

Some 80,000 children go missing in India every year. Future Hope works to change the lives of destitute children and help them to become independent, self-supporting members of society. Former students have gone on to develop successful careers in the hospitality industry, IT and financial sectors and sports management.

It is always amazing to meet people who have not only been moved by hearing news stories but have actually decided to do something about it.

I hope you enjoy the recipe book as much as we do. Every penny from the book sold via Steenbergs.co.uk is going to the charity.

5 Ways with Organic Lemon Extract

Monday, September 18th, 2017

organic-lemon-extract-60mlSteenbergs Organic Lemon Extract is a sunflower oil based extract with a glorious lemon citrus aroma and flavour.  It has been created particularly for use in home baking but complements everything from desserts through to chicken.

When we asked our spice panel to review and taste test the Lemon Extract, the responses ranged from ‘fresher than lemon juice’ and ‘smells like freshly zested lemon’ to ‘beautifully tangy’ with ‘an intense aroma’. The full details can be found on our blog, where you’ll find lots of suggestions of how to use it.

Here are a few for you to try at home…

1. Gluten Free Lemon & Almond CaSteenbergs gluten-free lemon drizzleke

This is a delicious moist cake which when we made it recently didn’t even last until it was cool! Enjoy with a refreshing cup of Earl Grey

2. Blueberry Oat TraybakeBlueberry oat tray bake

A tasty, healthy treat to satisfy the need for a sweet snack. The blueberries can be replaced with raspberries or blackberries depending upon the season and the addition of the tangy lemon extract really helps to accentuate the flavour of the fruit.

3. Lemon BiscuitsSteenbergs lemon biscuits

Cheryl from Madhouse Family Reviews tried these out for us a while ago to rave reviews from her children. She also made some with Steenbergs Organic Orange Extract and combined the flavours to make a St Clements variety.

The addition of the lemon extract gives a lovely chewy texture to the inside of the crunchy biscuit. A real treat topped off with Steenbergs organic Fairtrade Lemon Sugar!

4. Raw Lemon Browniesraw lemon brownies

Packed full of healthy nuts, seeds and organic fruit, these delicious raw brownies are really easy to make, with the lemon extract giving them a really fresh tang.

cupcakes - sept 125. Steenbergs Special Cupcakes

A take on the classic cupcake, here we have used our natural extracts to create a diverse range of delicious flavoured icings. With no added colouring, just add a little lemon zest on top to highlight the lemony taste.

Further suggestions

  • Lemon and honey are always good for colds so why not try a teaspoon of lemon extract and a heaped teaspoon of honey mixed with boiling water for a warming drink?
  • Add the lemon extract to sparkling water for a refreshing summer drink;
  • Mix in with your oil and vinegar to add zest to your salad dressings;
  • Blend with Steenbergs Herbes de Provence and spread over a whole chicken before roasting.

 

 

Turmeric: How To Make Fresh Turmeric Latte

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

Turmeric is a really popular spice for its healthanti-inflammatory and antioxidant – properties and is also regarded as a superfood. It also makes a tasty drink, sometimes called golden latte.

There are an increasing number of ready-made powder mixes on the market, often using dried coconut powder to give turmeric latte its milkiness.  But you don’t need to buy a premade mix, and you can make turmeric latte, or golden latte, yourself.

I find it refreshing, with an earthy and warming taste, and it also looks a lovely light yellow colour.  Here we add a little black pepper which increases the bioavailability of the curcumin in the turmeric, so increasing the healthiness of this turmeric drink.

Recipe for Fresh Turmeric Latte, or Golden Milk

Enough for 2 cups/mugs of Turmeric Latte

Ingredients

500 ml Almond milk (or other dairy-free milk)
0.5 cm Fresh ginger
1 cm Fresh turmeric
Pinch Black pepper – organic
0.5 tsp Cardamom powder, or 2 whole cardamom pods – crushed – organic
0.5 tsp Cinnamon powder (optional) – organic
1 tbsp Coconut sugar or honey

1. Cut 0.5 cm of fresh ginger, then remove the skin. Grate the fresh ginger and put into a small bowl.

2. Cut 1 cm piece of fresh turmeric, then remove the skin. Grate the fresh turmeric and put into a bowl. If you’ve got some rubber gloves, it is sensible to use them as turmeric can stain your fingers!

3. If you have a pestle and mortar, put the grated ginger turmeric into this then pound it down to a mushy pulp. This will increase the potency of the curcumin extracted.

4. Alternatively, put the grated ginger and turmeric plus 100 ml of almond milk into a blender and blitz to a mushy pulp.

5. Into a ramekin or small bowl, measure the cardamom, cinnamon and pepper.

6. Pour 500ml of almond milk (or other dairy-free milk) into a small saucepan.

7. Add the fresh ginger and turmeric. Whisk the almond milk to start infusing the flavours.

8. Add the ground, dry spices. Gently whisk the milk to mix through the dried spices.

9. Gently heat the almond milk, mixing the mixture gently every so often. When the almond milk is just below boiling point, take the pan off the heat.

10. Add 0.5 to 1 tablespoon of coconut sugar or honey to taste.

11.  Whisk gently to melt and mix the sugars in.

12.  Strain through a metal sieve. Pour into two mugs and enjoy.

For a quicker turmeric latte, you can use dry powdered ginger and turmeric.

A bit about Turmeric…

Saturday, August 12th, 2017

Turmeric RootSteenbergs Organic Fairtrade Turmeric comes from an organic and Fairtrade co-operative in the Kandy region of Sri Lanka. Turmeric originates from a root, known as the rhizome, Curcuma longa; it looks similar to ginger and galangal. To create turmeric powder, the turmeric rhizomes are lifted, boiled for one hour to fix the colours, dried for 10-15 days then cleaned (called polishing) before being crushed and ground.

The colour of turmeric comes from its natural curcumin colouration, although it’s commonly a bright yellow, it can also be more orange-yellow and almost brown.  Fairtrade turmeric has a distinct earthy aroma and a pleasing, sharp, bitter, spicy and lingering depth of flavour.

Turmeric has been widely used in Asia and India for centuries in cooking, and also as traditional medicines. Now, we are all beginning to understand its health benefits in a bit more detail.  As turmeric has been used as a traditional medicine, this implies that it may have health benefits, therefore here at Steenbergs we have done some googling and found that Curcumin doesn’t just give turmeric its vibrant yellow colour.

It is also the primary biologically active component of turmeric, as it has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Due to this there is high interest in curcumin as a lead molecule in anti-inflammatory drug development strategies, as curcumin has potential to alleviate and prevent multiple disease conditions, such as cancer, Alzheimer disease, heart disease and arthritis.

Over the last 25 years, curcumin has been extensively evaluated for its health promoting properties. Preclinical investigations provide substantial and compelling support for curcumin’s antioxidant, immunomodulatory, and anti-inflammatory properties; clinical studies are less numerous but are growing in number. For example, a head to head study carried out by W.C. Roberts found that daily ingestion of the turmeric component, curcumin can improve endothelial function just as well as up to one hour of aerobic exercise a day can! However, it was found, to get the best improvement in endothelial function a combination of both daily aerobic exercise and curcumin consumption are needed. Large clinical studies are needed to confirm the benefits of curcumin, current ongoing clinical studies should provide further insights in the future.

A problem with curcumin is that the liver sees it as being toxic, and therefore curcumin gets digested very quickly, giving it a low bioavailability. However, it has been found that when curcumin is consumed with pepper this can increase the bioavailability of curcumin. This is due to peppers active component, piperine. Piperine is an inhibitor of drug metabolism and therefore, prevents the liver breaking down curcumin. This leads to an increase curcumin in the blood, causing increased bioavailability. Therefore, consuming curcumin with pepper may enhance the potential benefits of curcumin.

A great way to try it is in a turmeric latte.

Reference: 

Singletary,K.,(2010) Turmeric: An Overview of Potential Health Benefits. Nutrition Today, 45(5), 216-225.

https://www.jenreviews.com/pepper/ – has a great article on the health benefits of pepper including 15 different pepper recipes

 Nutritional Values for Steenbergs Organic Turmeric Powder:

Values per 100g

Energy- 341kcal; 1449kj

Protein – 8.5g

Carbohydrates- 75.2g

Fat-0.7g

Values per 2.5g

Energy- 9kcal; 36kj

Protein – 0.2g

Carbohydrates- 1.9g

Fat- 0.0g

 Try turmeric now! 

What’s Going On With Vanilla?

Monday, July 24th, 2017
Fille Vanille

Vanilla Beans Being Processed In Madagascar

Having built a decent line in Fairtrade organic vanilla, we recently have had to stop selling it to trade because of supply issues.  At the same time, we’ve been asked by many new customers for vanilla or Fairtrade vanilla.  Everyone’s scrabbling around for a very limited supply of real vanilla, and also wanting a cheaper price where there’s none to be had – the market really has no supply and the prices are over £500/kg if you can find it.

But why is Steenbergs only selling it retail and not to wholesale customers?

In short, it’s because we’ve made almost nothing on vanilla over the last few years, vainly hoping that supply and pricing issues would ease through time.  However, because of recent cyclones and changes to vanilla processing in Madagascar, prices have remained too high for us to finance anymore.  So when we were asked to commit £250,000 for what used to cost £50,000, we politely decided now was the time to stop selling vanilla on a general scale.

Many reasons have been given for why the pricing is so high.  But it really is a simple economic matter of supply and demand – bad weather and poor processing practices have materially reduced the quantity of vanilla from the world’s largest producer (Madagascar) without any material reduction in demand.

It’s become a real issue in the industry, meaning that very little is available in the market.  And with retailers unwilling to move prices, it became a mug’s game to continue subsidising the prices.

But the real story is more nuanced and has its root cause in the introduction of free markets into the vanilla sector in the 1990s, and the rise of neoliberalisim and the Washington Consensus.  It has taken 20 years to unravel but the end result will be increased poverty within Madagascar, as well as fewer natural vanilla ice cream products on the shelves of high street retailers.

For those interested in the longer view, here’s my timeline:

Where The Story Begins: 1995 – 2000

Vanilla Planters Walking Along Track

Vanilla Planters Walking Along Track

The seeds of the vanilla story can be found in 1995.  Before then, the vanilla market was a fixed monopoly – the Madagascan Government controlled quality, harvesting and pricing, which it negotiated with the major exporters and producers each year in Paris.  This ensured vanilla beans were harvested at strict times, were processed at Government curing centres and that prices were kept in a tight $70 – $90/kg.

But the rise of neoliberal economics and the Washington Consensus put paid to this,  Following advice from the EU and the World Bank, Madagascar dropped the carefully controlled, planned vanilla economy and let rip with free market economics.  Immediately, the price of vanilla plunged.  Next, the EU unravelled the state-controlled curing system and encouraged farmers to cure their own beans to earn more cash for themselves.  While prices continued to remain low, quality also suffered.

Allied to this, Madagascan politics were tricky to say the least, with the Madagascan Government suffering many years of weak government, governance and political instability.

The Start Of Fairtrade Vanilla: 2005 – 2013

When we started out in 2004, there had been three years of failed crops in Madagascar, which supplies around 85% of global supply.  The price of vanilla rocketed to a high of $600 (2005).  Small-scale farmers around the world wanted to cash in and took out bank loans to plant vanilla vines – vanilla really is a real small-scale artisan crop.

But by 2006, the Madagascan crop had succeeded, together with additional supply from new regions, and the price imploded, crashing to $50 (2005/6), then further down to $25 (2006-8).  Financial disaster ensued for the many farmers that had borrowed against the higher prices.

In stepped Fairtrade.  This was a classic Fairtrade scenario – to protect relatively unsophisticated farmers, who grow cash crops in the Global South for the Global North, from the harshest impacts of free markets, and the effects of global commodity and financial markets.  Fairtrade vanilla supply chains were developed in Madagascar and India.

The Vanilla Tightens: 2013 – 2017

However, the story did not end there.

In 2013/4, real vanilla began to increase in popularity as a premium addition to many products, with consumer interest in purity – organicFairtradeGMO-free becoming important.  With increased demand, prices for vanilla began to move from $20/kg to $55-65/kg.  At the same time, farmers started storing their vanilla in vacuum packs.  After several poor harvests, prices rocket to $80/kg from $30/kg for green beans by the end of the year, with cured vanilla at $240/kg.

In 2017, when the market was expecting a better harvest, disaster struck with the devastating cyclone – Enawo – bringing winds of up to 270 km/hour.  It began on 7 March striking land between Antalaha and Sambava, then forked to Maroansetra and Mananara, before crossing the centre of Madagascar and leaving on the south of the island on 10 March.  It destroyed about 20% of vanilla plants in Madagascar, hitting the north-east and east coast of Madagascar the hardest.  Antalaha was affected the most, with 90% of the town, its infrastructure and crops destroyed.  Enawo’s impact has been that all the expected uplift in supply was decimated, so the harvest is expected to remain at 2016 levels at about 12,000 tonnes, equivalent to 1,400 tonnes of exportable vanilla beans (i.e. 8kg of green vanilla for 1kg cured vanilla) – this is insufficient for global demand.

The organic market is even tighter.  Effectively, there is no free stock in the supply chain, with speculators buying up anything they can find, drip feeding them into the market at very high prices.  Cured organic vanilla is at $545/kg and we expect it to be at these levels for at least another 18 months and there to be no meaningful reduction in prices until 2019-20.

With our forward contracts delivered and at these high prices, vanilla pods and vanilla extract has now become uneconomic and high risk.  Therefore, in May 2017, Steenbergs decided to reduce its position in the market and only fulfil internet orders, removing itself from the wholesale market.  Basically, the risks in the market became too great for a small business like Steenbergs.

Downside Risks – Disaster Looms in 2020?

It is our opinion that disaster looms ahead for vanilla with a market crash self-evident.

On the one hand, high prices are great news for farmers.  However, the short-term masks significant downside risks in the not too distant future:

  • Demand is contracting with end-users reformulating and/or switching to artificial alternatives.  Industrial vanillin is suitable for many applications where a velvety richness is needed, without any complexity of aroma or taste – e.g. for cheaper chocolate or soft drinks.  In the period 2000 – 2005, about one-quarter of demand fell away, although some returned more recently with demand for pure vanilla.
  • Supply is increasing with vanilla vines being replanted at a rate of 25%.  Vanilla orchids flower 3 – 4 years after being planted, with vanilla pods being harvested for the first time several months later.  This replanting will return production to higher levels than prior to 2010.

The convergence of reduced demand and increased supply will at some point cause prices to crash – perhaps in 2020.  When that happens, it will unfortunately be the small-scale farmers that suffer – as always.

Cinnamon – Can Science Show Differences In Taste Between Cassia And Cinnamon

Friday, June 23rd, 2017

In 2015, we did a study of the coumarin level in cinnamon, cassia and tonka beans.  Following on from that, I decided to get the “active” volatile oils analysed in a few types of cinnamon.  In the past, we have done more general tests and found cinnamon with 40 – 100mg/kg of volatile oils, including: styrene, pinene, benzaldehyde, o-cymene, linalool, linalylanthranilate, capaene, caryaphyllene and g-caryaphyllene.

I was interested in whether you could see a discernible pattern in the spectrum of flavour chemicals that corresponded back to the aromas and tastes that I experienced in the different types of cinnamon when I tested them for quality.

In short, the answer was yes there is a real difference.

Not only are the levels of coumarin much higher in cassia and Indian cinnamon, but the cinnamon aldehyde in cassia is almost double that in true cinnamon.  This is perhaps why cassia seems to have a blunter and more aggressive cinnamon taste that is loved by bakers.

There are clear levels of eugenol in true cinnamon and lower amounts in cassia and Indian cinnamon; this imparts a clove taste to true cinnamon.  In contrast, cassia and Indian cinnamon has a more eucalypt that is refreshingly aromatic.

I also found it interesting that there was limonene in true cinnamon, because I have always felt there was a citrus aroma and taste to true cinnamon.  And true cinnamon has high levels of linalool that has a floral spiciness and the piney woodiness of cymenes.

The science seems to vindicate the description I use in the Steenbergs’ website for cinnamon:

“Cinnamon powder has a complex and fragrant citrus flavour that is full of exotic sweetness.  Cinnamon’s perfumed aroma is unique but has hints of clove, nutmeg and sandalwood.”

Results from Analysis of Volatile Oils in Different Types of Cinnamon

 

Product name Cassia Indian cinnamon True cinnamon True cinnamon
Botanical name Cinnamomum cassia Cinnamomum bejolghota Cinnamomum zeylanicum (C. verum) Cinnamomum zeylanicum (C. verum)
Origin Indonesia India Sri Lanka Madagascar
Units mg/kg mg/kg mg/kg mg/kg
alpha-Terpineol 94 46 56 25
Benzaldehyde 37 59 61 23
Caryophyllene 146 26 292 153
Cinnamon aldehyde 23,775 7,166 13,929 13,391
Coumarin 191 295 <5 Trace
Eucalyptol 39 89 <5 <5
Eugenol 96 <5 330 188
Limonene Trace Trace 5 <5
Linalool 14 Trace 115 35
para-Cymen Trace Trace 33 7

An Easter Treat: Dark Chocolate ganache cake with happy hippy flower salt

Wednesday, April 12th, 2017
Easter Chocolate Cake

Easter Chocolate Cake

It’s the classic combination that’s a true winner every time: Dark chocolate and sea salt. Happy hippy flower salt is wonderfully versatile in both savoury and sweet dishes. The flavour is delicate and soft on the palette yet robust and course enough for it to be sprinkled liberally on top of the cake. This vegan chocolate ganache cake has a wonderfully gorgeous crunch to it thanks to the happy hippy flower salt, making it absolutely stunning for showcasing your cake.

This dark chocolate ganache cake is perfect for special occasions as it can be used as a base for many different events or when you just fancy a cake for yourself. It’s used here for Easter and is so chocolatey but enhanced further by the happy hippy flower salt. Here’s how you can create this gluten free and light yet tasty vegan dark chocolate ganache cake which everyone can enjoy:

All you need is:

(Use organic/natural real food ingredients where possible)
Serves: 6-8

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cooking time: 15-20 minutes
Total time: 30 minutes

From your kitchen:

A whisk
A fork
A large mixing bowl
A couple of teaspoons and tablespoons
A round baking tin
A silicone spatula
A small glass bowl
A wooden spoon
A butter knife
A sheet of greaseproof paper

For the cake:

3 tablespoons of olive oil
2 tablespoons of coconut oil
4 tablespoons of agave syrup
3 tablespoons of coconut sugar
Up to 150ml of almond milk
50g of self-raising flour
200g of almond flour
½ teaspoon of baking powder
60g of non-dairy dark chocolate chips (80% minimum)
2 tablespoons of raw cacao powder or 3 tablespoons of cocoa powder
1 teaspoon of Steenbergs organic Fairtrade vanilla extract

Happy Hippy Flower Salt

Happy Hippy Flower Salt

For the ganache frosting:

200g of non- dairy dark 80% chocolate
2 tablespoons of boiling water
2 tablespoons of agave syrup
1 level tablespoon of happy hippy flower salt

Step 1:

Preheat your oven to 180° C or gas mark 4 and line your round baking tray with greaseproof paper. Set aside whilst you prepare your cake.

Step 2:

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together your coconut oil and olive oil. Add in your coconut sugar and agave syrup and mix well.

Step 3:

Next, using a wooden spoon, fold in your cacao/cocoa powder, almond flour, self-raising flour and baking powder and alternate with your almond milk so your cake batter isn’t too thick to handle.

Step 4:

Finally, add in your dark chocolate chips, your Himalayan salt and fold in gently. Pour your batter into your cake tin and bake for 15-20 minutes. Turn over onto a wire rack to cool whilst you prepare your frosting.

Step 5:

In small glass bowl break up your dark chocolate into little pieces and add your boiling water. Whisk in gently using your hand whisk or fork. Add in more hot water if needed and if it’s too watery, break in some more dark chocolate. Whisk in your agave syrup which will help to thicken up your frosting. Allow to cool thoroughly before using your frosting knife or butter knife to frost your cake. Sprinkle your happy hippy flower salt over your cooled cake and it’s ready for your Easter table. This cake can be stored in the fridge for up to three days.

Article written and researched by

Niki Behjousiar

Recipe Creator and founder of nikibakes

www.facebook.com/nikibakes

www.nikibakes.co.uk

Twitter: @Niki_Beh 

nikibakes has been blogging for over 10 years and has a passion for gluten free and dairy free recipes. She’s a Persian chef who loves all things spice and particularly enjoys Asian and South American cuisine. She’s always on the lookout for fresh and delicious flavour combinations and uses our spices daily in her cooking and on her blog.

 

A slice of North Africa: Harissa with rose spice blend

Thursday, March 9th, 2017

Continuing with our series spotlighting one of the Steenbergs key products.

Harissa is the staple spice for North African cuisine and adds a good kick of spice and warmth to your meals. Harissa is most commonly used for soups, stews and even a spice rub for meat and fish. Like the Steenbergs blend, rose petals are also a common addition and add a flamboyant touch to your dishes. A little does go a long way so if you prefer a slightly milder flavour you can control it easily by adding a little less but still getting that warming and savoury flavour which is characteristic for this lovely blend. It’s a hot blend of organic crushed chillies coming together with organic caraway, organic coriander and organic cumin, a true slice of North Africa wafting into your kitchen.

Steenbergs Organic Harissa with Rose Spice Blend, created and blended in North Yorkshire.

Steenbergs Organic Harissa with Rose Spice Blend, created and blended in North Yorkshire.

Harissa with Rose Spiced Sweet Potato Fritters

These fritters are delicately flavoured with the Steenbergs Organic harissa with rose and are quite easy to make. They are perfect for picnics or a light brunch served with a couple of poached eggs and a light garden salad.

All you need is:

Ingredients:

(Makes up to 15 fritters)

(Use organic/natural real food ingredients where possible)

Prep time: 5 minutes

Cooking time: 20-25 minutes

Total time: 40 minutes

2 sweet potatoes, peeled and coarsely grated

1 teaspoon of happy hippy flower salt

½ teaspoon of organic smoked paprika

½ teaspoon of organic harissa with rose

2 spring onions or 1 red onion, chopped finely

1 tablespoon of all-purpose flour

2 free range eggs

1-2 tablespoons of coconut oil for frying

 

From your kitchen:

 

A wooden spoon

A sharp knife

A shallow frying pan

A grater

A silicone spatula

A couple of tablespoons for measuring

A mixing bowl

A tablespoon for measuring our your fritters

 

Recipe for Harissa with Rose spiced fritters.

Recipe for Harissa with Rose spiced fritters.

Method:

Step 1:

In your mixing bowl add in the grated sweet potatoes, spring onions (or red onions if using) and mix well with your all purpose flour, use a wooden spoon for this so it’s evenly dispersed.

Step 2:

Crack in your eggs one by one and using your spatula mix well until the mixture comes together. At this stage add in your lovely harissa with rose, smoked paprika and seasoning and whisk again until it’s all well dispersed into your mixture.

Step 3:

Heat your frying pan over a medium high heat and melt your coconut oil. Fry your fritters using your tablespoon for measuring them out evenly. Fry on each side for a couple of minutes or until the edges start to go golden brown.

These gorgeous fritters are wondering with some sliced avocado as well with extra harissa with rose sprinkled on top, a double whammy of flavour!

Recipe created and researched by:

Niki Behjousiar

Recipe Creator and founder of nikibakes

www.facebook.com/nikibakes

www.nikibakes.co.uk

Twitter: @Niki_Beh

nikibakes has been blogging for over 10 years and has a passion for gluten free and dairy free recipes. She’s a Persian chef who loves all things spice and particularly enjoys Asian and South American cuisine. She’s always on the lookout for fresh and delicious flavour combinations and uses our spices daily in her cooking and on her blog.

STEENBERGS BUYS OLD HAMLET WINE & SPICE

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

Axel and Sophie Steenberg are pleased to announce that Steenbergs Limited (Steenbergs), the organic and Fairtrade spice experts, has acquired the business of Old Hamlet Wine & Spice (Old Hamlet), the mulled wine specialists.

Old Hamlet Wine and Spice product range includes Fairtrade mulling wine and cider sachets in their distinctive cloth bags, made in the UK.

Old Hamlet Wine and Spice product range includes Fairtrade mulling wine and cider sachets in their distinctive cloth bags, made in the UK.

Old Hamlet was established in 1975 Bury St Edmunds and has been owned by Tim and Rachel Bell since 1991. Under their enthusiastic management, Old Hamlet has become a leader in making hand-crafted mulling wine mixes in cotton bags.

Not only does Old Hamlet fit neatly with Steenbergs existing spice and mulling spices products, but Old Hamlet’s ethical principles dovetail with those of Steenbergs, with both businesses committed to fair trading.

Further, both Tim and Rachel Bell have committed to provide Steenbergs with consultancy to ensure a smooth handover for customers, suppliers and to help with production quality.

Axel Steenberg commented: “We have long admired the work of Tim and Rachel at Old Hamlet and their strong ethical principles, so we were delighted when the opportunity to buy the business came along. We will look to build on their fabulous products and, perhaps, bring in a few new ones as well.”

Tim Bell said: “We are very pleased that Axel and Sophie Steenberg will be taking over the running of Old Hamlet and are looking forward to working with them to ensure a trouble-free transition for our customers.”