Archive for the ‘white tea’ Category

Steenbergs: progress at 11 Hallikeld Close

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016

Progress on Steenbergs’ new factory is moving along decently since April.  The joists have been put in for the second floor and most of the flooring.

The building work has created a mass of extra space that can be used to store our tea.  Building control have agreed the structural calculations, standards for fire rating and the shape and positioning of the staircase to the second floor.

We should get delivery this week of a new labelling machine from Norpak in Bradford to help with the growth in demand for our organic spices and seasonings – especially the mini jars that are going well in Abel & Cole’s recipe boxes and for gifts sets.  A new packing machine is also being built for us at Gainsborough Engineering in Lincolnshire which should help underpin interest in Steenbergs loose leaf teas and herbal teas.

A couple of photos are below:

Ancient Roots with Modern Benefits – Steenbergs’ Top 10 Superfoods Selection

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016

With Gwyneth Paltrow extolling the virtues of Matcha Tea and Victoria Beckham tweeting about the benefits of Bee Pollen, superfoods have never been more on trend.  Now through partnerships with like-minded artisan producers, Steenbergs offers a full complement of powders, seeds and teas to boost the body and get you set for 2016.

Greens Organic Smoothie with Bee Pollen

Greens Organic Smoothie with Bee Pollen

With the rise in popularity of smoothies and juices as foods on the go, as well as the increase in vegan and special dietary regimes, there is now, more than ever, a need to make sure that our bodies are getting enough of the right minerals, vitamins and proteins. Superfoods, especially in powder or seed form, are a quick and easy way of adding those much-needed nutrients.

Greens Organic owners Morris & Nicky, who have been vegetarian for most of their lives, take superfoods to boost the vitamins and minerals in their diet.  “All the superfoods we stock we take ourselves, so we know each of the products inside out…and our favourite has always been the Spanish organic bee pollen.”

Axel, who set up Steenbergs in 2003 with his wife Sophie, drink a cup of matcha tea to kick start the day and often make a turmeric tea to ward off colds.  Axel also uses maca and baobab to boost his morning smoothies. “The baobab has an unusual tart tropical flavour which is delicious when blended with other fruits.”

Here are Axel’s current Top 10 favourite superfoods:

  1. Chlorella – a blue-green algae that has the highest content of chlorophyll of any food on the planet! Chlorella is an easy way to get your ‘Super Green’ boost each day.

Greens Organic organic Chlorella Powder: £18.99 for 250g

  1. Bee Pollen – Greens Organic organic bee pollen comes from the unspoilt mountainous regions of north western Spain, using natural, organic bee-keeping methods to ensure the health of the bees and the purity of their pollen. Organic bee pollen contains high amounts of Vitamin B1, which contributes to the maintenance of normal skin.

Greens Organic Raw Bee Pollen: £13.99 for 250g

  1. Spirulina – a blue-green algae that’s over 3 billion years old, and one of the most nutritious superfoods on the planet.

Naturya organic Spirulina Powder: £11.99 for 200g

  1. Moringa – made from the naturally dried leaf of the moringa tree (or Miracle Tree), Moringa is a rich source of plant protein and is high in 10 essential vitamins and minerals, including iron, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus -all of which are great for normal energy release.

Aduna organic Moringa Powder: £7.99 for 100g

  1. Chia – Chia seeds are an ancient South American superfood. Their very subtle nutty taste allows you to add them to absolutely anything that you eat or drink – helping to boost your nutritional, antioxidants and Omega 3 intake. Sprinkle Chia seeds on salads, cereals, yogurt, even soup, or add a sprinkling in your baking – great in bread, cakes, cookies and biscuits.

Raw Chia Seeds: £6.99 for 230g

  1. Baobab – Organic Baobab fruit pulp and seed powder is harvested from the inside of the coconut-like fruit of the mythical African Baobab tree. This fine powder is full of essential nutrients and packed with vitamins & minerals. It has an exceptionally high level of fibre (45g), and recent research has shown that baobab has a very high antioxidant level. It’s delicious as a flavouring in smoothies, yoghurts, cereals and even jam.

Of The Earth Superfoods Raw Organic Baobab: £9.99 for 150g

  1. Maca – is a source of thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, calcium, zinc and iron which all contribute to normal energy-yielding metabolism. Add to baking for a smooth malty flavour, or smoothies for a tangy taste of Peru. Enjoy as a part of a healthy lifestyle and a balanced diet.

Naturya Organic Maca Root Powder: £19.99 for 300g

  1. Turmeric – Used in Chinese and Indian medicine for its anti-inflammatory properties and its ability to reduce infection, turmeric isturmeric-powder-organic-fairtrade-40g high in anti-oxidants. Grown as an annual, it looks similar to ginger and galangal, with the powdered organic Fairtrade turmeric being a bright yellow with a distinct earthy aroma and a pleasing, sharp, bitter, spicy and lingering depth of flavour. Steenbergs Organic Fairtrade Turmeric comes from an organic and Fairtrade co-operative in the Kandy region of Sri Lanka.

Steenbergs organic Fairtrade Turmeric: £2.60 for 40g; www.steenbergs.co.uk

  1. Matcha Tea – Steenbergs Organic Matcha Tea is highly matcha tea openregarded for its health properties due to its relatively high levels of antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and nutrients. Grown in the Nishio area of Japan, where Japanese Zen Buddhist monks and the Japanese Imperial Family have drunk it for hundreds of years, the leaves are grown in a way that produces extra amounts of chlorphyll and natural amino acids and are then ground down to a bright green fine powder.

Steenbergs organic Matcha Tea: £16.75 for 30g; www.steenbergs.co.uk

  1. Organic White Tea –although harvested from torganic-white-tea-loose-leaf-bai-mu-dan-caddyhe same plant, white tea has higher anti-oxidant levels and less caffeine than green tea, due to minimal processing, helping to promote overall health and wellbeing. Steenbergs Organic White Tea is an Organic Bai Mu Dan – literally White Peony – an organic white tea from the Fujian Province of China.

Steenbergs organic White Tea: £5.65 for 50g; www.steenbergs.co.uk

All products listed above are available at www.steenbergs.co.uk.  To view the full range of health boosting superfoods available at Steenbergs, please visit: https://steenbergs.co.uk/subcategory/139/smoothie-and-juice-ingredients.

We wish you a healthy and energy-filled 2016!

What’s the carbon footprint of your cuppa?

Tuesday, May 19th, 2015

It depends is perhaps the best answer.

It depends on what you drink and also on how you treat changes in land use.

For tea, the carbon footprint is 87 g CO2 for a mug of Steenbergs black tea taken with milk.

This includes the carbon footprint of brewed tea is 48 g CO2 for black tea, plus also probably for white, green and herbal teas.  But to this, we need to add another 39 g CO2 for any milk added, if (as most Brits do) your tea is made with milk.

If you use teabags, an extra 4 g CO2 is added, or 5% to the carbon footprint.

This compares with 129 g CO2 for a coffee.  About 60% of this comes from the coffee itself and the remainder from the milk.  For milkier coffees like a cappuccino or latte, the carbon footprint is much larger at 222 g CO2 and 318 g CO2, because more milk is used.

Hot chocolate have the biggest footprint with its major cost again the milk.  If you include land use changes for the cocoa, this becomes even larger with the cost of the mix doubling to 43 g CO2 per mug from 21 g CO2.

Carbon in hot beverages

Carbon footprint of hot drinks

What does this tell us?

We can all reduce our carbon footprints by drinking less milk.  We can have lighter teas drunk without milk, and cut back on large lattes and hot chocolates. White and green teas, Darjeeling or China teas and herbal infusions are other tasty possibilities.

Then, drink loose leaf infusions rather than teabags as this extra packaging ups your CO2.

Notes

Carbon dioxide is lazily used here to mean carbon dioxide equivalent, i.e. it includes carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide gases.

These are comparable to figures in Mike Berners-Lee’s book “How bad are bananas?: tea with milk 71 g CO2, tea without milk 21 g CO2, milky coffee 71 g CO2, cappuccino 235 g CO2 and a large latte 340 g CO2.  His book did not have figures for hot chocolate, or at least I couldn’t find any.

How much water is needed for a mug of coffee or tea?

Wednesday, March 25th, 2015

The simple answer is not much – about 225ml.

But look deeper and we need to consider the rainwater needed to grow the coffee beans and tea leaves, plus the water used to process these and make any packaging.

Over the last few years, we have been looking at the environmental costs within Steenbergs products.  We have looked at our carbon footprint, possible pollution from cleaning chemicals and our recycling rates.

Our main finding has been that over the lifecycle of Steenbergs’ products the biggest environmental burden by far is the virtual water (i) to grow Steenbergs’ herbs, spices and teas and which is then transferred when these move from India or Sri Lanka to the UK.

In money terms, the environmental costs of water usage are 2½ times larger than our carbon footprint.  It’s about 138 million litres, roughly 55 Olympic swimming pools.

Furthermore, this virtual water dwarfs the actual water used to make a mug of coffee or tea – the 225ml we glibly used for our initial answer.

The virtual water in a mug of coffee or tea is 635 times and 151 times the actual water used to make your drink.

So 143 litres of virtual water are needed to grow your morning coffee, but only 0.2 litre of water is needed to make it.  In contrast, the virtual water for tea is 34 litres, one quarter of the water consumed in a coffee.

If you include the virtual water in milk, this bumps up the figures to a hefty 169 litres of water needed for a mug of coffee and 60 litres for a mug of tea.

For a hot chocolate, it’s even higher.  415 litres of water, mainly rainwater, are needed for each hot chocolate.  That’s a whopping 2048 times more water than your mug holds.

For cappuccinos and lattes, more coffee is used in making the espresso and quite a lot of milk is then added.  This ups the virtual water content to 340 litres for a cappuccino and 381 litres of your latte.

So next time you have a drink, pause for a moment to think about the massive amounts of rainwater that were needed for your small cuppa.

Graph that shows breakdown of water between blue and virtual water in hot beverages

Breakdown of total water in hot beverages

Notes:

(i) Virtual water is “the volume of water that is required to produce the product.”

(ii) Water footprint calculations:

water table

(iii) In our calculations, we have drawn heavily on the pioneering work of Chapagain and Hoekstra of the University of Twente (Netherlands):

Chapagain, A.K., Hoekstra, A.Y. (2004) Water footprints of nations, Volume 2: appendices, UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Research Report Series No. 16, November 2004

Chapagain, A.K., Hoekstra, A.Y. (2007) The water footprint of coffee and tea consumption in the Netherlands, Ecological Economics, 66: 109-118

Jefferies, D., Muñoz, I., Hodges, J., King, V. J., Aldaya, M., Ercin, A. E., Milà i Canals, L., Hoekstra, A. Y. (2012) Water footprint and life cycle assessment as approaches to asses potential impacts of products on water consumption.  Key learning points from pilot studies on tea and margarine, Journal of Cleaner Production, 33: 155-166

Time for Tea with @JasmineTrinity

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Time for Tea – our regular chat with someone who cares about tea. This time it’s with Jasmine Trinity owner of the Self-Sufficient Cafe – a virtual cafe which showcases tasty vegan recipes .

Jasmine Trinity of the Self Sufficient Cafe Blog talks to us about tea

1. What is your favourite tea to set you up for the day first thing in the morning?
At the moment it’s Lady Grey, I really enjoy a cup first thing and it gets me going, ready for the day ahead. I just love the delicate flavours and the perfume it gives.

2. What is your favourite tea to relax you in the afternoon?
Green Tea with Jasmine, it keeps me calm especially if I’m having a manic day at work!

3. What do you like best about Steenbergs teas?
The extensive range of teas, I would love to try all of them! I’m a massive fan of tea!

Steenbergs loose leaf white tea with lemongrass and orange blossom is a beautiful tea.

4. Which Steenbergs tea would you most like to try and why?

I think I’d have to go for the white tea with lemon grass and orange blossom. I haven’t tried many white teas and this one sounds just perfect for a Spring morning, which hopefully is just around the corner.

5. Who would you most like to have a cup of tea with and why?
Now there’s a question! Who would it be? Decisions decisions……at this moment in time I think it would have to be Tobey Maguire, fellow vegan and spiderman, perhaps he could help me overcome my phobia with spiders!

Your contact details
Website: http://selfsufficientcafe.blogspot.co.uk/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SelfSufficientCafe
Twitter: @JasmineTrinity
LinkedIn: Jasmine Trinity
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/jasminetrinity/

a virtual cafe which showcases tasty vegan recipes